external image follow-us-on-twitter-bird.jpg
Email Me
Email Me

IMG_0084.JPG
==

==

Technology Standards for 6-8th grade students:



STATE OF TEXAS 6TH GRADE SCIENCE TEKS
Objective:

Scientific Investigation, Reasoning

112.18.a.4.A (Introduction) Scientific Investigations and reasoning.
(i) To develop a rich knowledge of science and the natural world, students must become familiar with different modes of scientific inquiry, rules of evidence, ways of formulating questions, ways of proposing explanations, and the diverse ways scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on evidence derived from their work.
(ii) Scientific investigations are conducted for different reasons. All investigations require a research question, careful observations, data gathering, and analysis of the data to identify the patterns that will explain the findings. Descriptive investigations are used to explore new phenomena such as conducting surveys of organisms or measuring the abiotic components in a given habitat. Descriptive statistics include frequency, range, mean, median, and mode. A hypothesis is not required in a descriptive investigation. On the other hand, when conditions can be controlled in order to focus on a single variable, experimental research design is used to determine causation. Students should experience both types of investigations and understand that different scientific research questions require different research designs.
(iii) Scientific investigations are used to learn about the natural world. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by investigations, and the methods, models, and conclusions built from these investigations change as new observations are made. Models of objects and events are tools for understanding the natural world and can show how systems work. Models have limitations and based on new discoveries are constantly being modified to more closely reflect the natural world.
112.18.b.1-4 (Knowledge and Skills) Scientific Investigations and reasoning.

(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student, for at least 40% of instructional time, conducts laboratory and field investigations following safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student is expected to:
(A) demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards; and
(B) practice appropriate use and conservation of resources, including disposal, reuse, or recycling of materials.
(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:
(A) plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(B) design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(C) collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers;
(D) construct tables and graphs, using repeated trials and means, to organize data and identify patterns; and
(E) analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions and knows the contributions of relevant scientists. The student is expected to:
(A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as a model of Earth's layers;
(C) identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials; and
(D) relate the impact of research on scientific thought and society, including the history of science and contributions of scientists as related to the content.
(4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and safety equipment to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to:
(A) use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information, including journals/notebooks, beakers, Petri dishes, meter sticks, graduated cylinders, hot plates, test tubes, triple beam balances, microscopes, thermometers, calculators, computers, timing devices, and other equipment as needed to teach the curriculum; and
(B) use preventative safety equipment, including chemical splash goggles, aprons, and gloves, and be prepared to use emergency safety equipment, including an eye/face wash, a fire blanket, and a fire extinguisher.
TEKS Review
1. 20 Inquiry Question Quiz (good questions)
2. Scientific Method Matching Game (good game)
3. Investigation/Reasoning & safety Games
SMARTBoard Notebook Activities
1. Scale Models Instructional Notebook file
2. Estimations Instructional Notebook file
3. Making Inferences Instructional Notebook file
4. Detail Observation Skills Instructional Notebook file
Powerpoints
1. Steps of the Scientific Method
2. Several Scientific Method PowerPoints
Inspiration Templates
1. Scientific Method Inspiration file (Free Login required)
2. Scientific Method Inspiration File 2 (Free Login required)
Discovery Education Movie Clip Titles
1. How Scientists Work: What Is the Scientific Method? 21min with Blackline Masters
2. Scientific Method & Measurement 38min. with Blackline Masters

//Back to top//


Objective:

Matter, Elements and Energy

112.18.a.4.B (Introduction) Matter, Elements and Energy.
(i) Matter can be classified as elements, compounds, or mixtures. Students have already had experience with mixtures in Grade 5, so Grade 6 will concentrate on developing an understanding of elements and compounds. It is important that students learn the differences between elements and compounds based on observations, description of physical properties, and chemical reactions. Elements are represented by chemical symbols, while compounds are represented by chemical formulas. Subsequent grades will learn about the differences at the molecular and atomic level.
(ii) Elements are classified as metals, nonmetals, and metalloids based on their physical properties. The elements are divided into three groups on the Periodic Table. Each different substance usually has a different density, so density can be used as an identifying property. Therefore, calculating density aids classification of substances.
(iii) Energy resources are available on a renewable, nonrenewable, or indefinite basis. Understanding the origins and uses of these resources enables informed decision making. Students should consider the ethical/social issues surrounding Earth's natural energy resources, while looking at the advantages and disadvantages of their long-term uses.
112.18.b.5 (Knowledge and Skills) Matter, Elements and Energy.
The student knows the differences between elements and compounds. The student is expected to:
(A) know that an element is a pure substance represented by chemical symbols;
(B) recognize that a limited number of the many known elements comprise the largest portion of solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere;
(C) differentiate between elements and compounds on the most basic level; and
(D) identify the formation of a new substance by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a gas, change in temperature, production of a precipitate, or color change.
TEKS Review
1. 28 Question Energy Test
2. 55 Question Energy Test
4. Fling the Teacher Energy Game
5. Fling the Teacher Matter & Energy Game
7. Energy Quiz
8. Earth's Energy Source Millionaire Game
Interactive Activities
1. Roller Coaster Ride on Kinetic Energy
2. Create your own rollercoaster ride by drawing in the tracks
3. Mr. Lawson's Interactive websites
5. Energy Information & Games
6. Watch Potential to Kinetic Movie Clip Online
Study Guides/Research

Smartboard Activities
1. Tornadoes Instructional Notebook file
2. Solar Power Instructional Notebook file
3. Geothermal Energy Instructional Notebook file
4. Anticipated Energy Loss Instructional Notebook file
5. Renewable Energy Instructional Notebook file
Powerpoints
1. Several Force, Motion & Energy PowerPoints
2. Energy Instructional PowerPoint
3. Potential vs Kinetic Energy Instructional PowerPoint
4. Instructional PowerPoint
Inspiration Templates
1. States of Matter Sort (Free Login Required)
2. States of Matter Sort 2 (Free Login Required)
Discovery Education Movie Clip Titles
1. Matter and Energy: Energy: What Is It? 12min with Blackline Master
Teacher Resources
1. Movie clips on Force & Energy

Back to top
Objective:

Force, Motion, and Energy

112.18.a.4.C (Introduction) Force, Motion and Energy.
  • Energy occurs in two types, potential and kinetic, and can take several forms. Thermal energy can be transferred by conduction, convection, or radiation. It can also be changed from one form to another.
  • Students will investigate the relationship between force and motion using a variety of means, including calculations and measurements.
112.18.b.6-9 (Knowledge and Skills) Force, Motion and Energy.
(6) Matter and energy. The student knows matter has physical properties that can be used for classification. The student is expected to:
(A) compare metals, nonmetals, and metalloids using physical properties such as luster, conductivity, or malleability;
(B) calculate density to identify an unknown substance; and
(C) test the physical properties of minerals, including hardness, color, luster, and streak.
(7) Matter and energy. The student knows that some of Earth's energy resources are available on a nearly perpetual basis, while others can be renewed over a relatively short period of time. Some energy resources, once depleted, are essentially nonrenewable. The student is expected to:
(A) research and debate the advantages and disadvantages of using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear power, biomass, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and solar resources; and
(B) design a logical plan to manage energy resources in the home, school, or community.
(8) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows force and motion are related to potential and kinetic energy. The student is expected to:
(A) compare and contrast potential and kinetic energy;
(B) identify and describe the changes in position, direction, and speed of an object when acted upon by unbalanced forces;
(C) calculate average speed using distance and time measurements;
(D) measure and graph changes in motion; and
(E) investigate how inclined planes and pulleys can be used to change the amount of force to move an object.
(9) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that the Law of Conservation of Energy states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, it just changes form. The student is expected to:
(A) investigate methods of thermal energy transfer, including conduction, convection, and radiation;
(B) verify through investigations that thermal energy moves in a predictable pattern from warmer to cooler until all the substances attain the same temperature such as an ice cube melting; and
(C) demonstrate energy transformations such as energy in a flashlight battery changes from chemical energy to electrical energy to light energy.
TEKS Review
5. 8 Question Matter Test
6. Fling the Teacher Game
7. Atom & Element Millionaire Game
8. Millionaire Game
9. 6th grade Science PortaPortal Links & Games
10. Atoms Mutliple-choice Quiz
11. Matter Games
12. Atoms & Elements Millionaire Game
13. Matter Millionaire Game
14.Question test on Atoms
4. Fling the Teacher Game
6. Absorbed vs Reflected Energy Multiple-choice Fill-in-the-blank
4. Force, Matter, Gravity & Weight BBC
9. Millionaire Game Kinetic Energy
10. Kinetic vs. Potential Energy Cloze
3. Potential vs Kinetic Energy Millionaire Game
11. Games
12. Force & Energy Cloze
7. Games
9. Solar Energy Cloze
Interactive Activities
1. Create your own Tornado National Geographic
Smartboard Activities
1. Protons, Neutrons and Electrons Instructional Notebook file
2. Predominating Elements & Ocean Instructional Notebook file
3. Predominating Elements Instructional Notebook file
13. Elements & Symbols Instructional Notebook file
1. Hurricanes Instructional Notebook file
2. Hurricanes 2 Instructional Notebook
3. Cloud Formation Instructional Notebook file
4. Wave Length Light Instructional Notebook file
5. Warm Air Molecules 2 Instructional Notebook file
6. Warm Air Molecules Instructional Notebook file
7. Ultra Violet & Visible Light Instructional Notebook file
8. Solar Radiation Spectrum Instructional Notebook file
9. Reflection Light Instructional Notebook file
10. Infrared Radiation Instructional Notebook file
11. How to Measure Temperature Instructional Notebook file
12. Greenhouse Effect Instructional Notebook file
14. Cold Warm Molecules Instructional Notebook file
Powerpoints
1. Several Force, Motion & Energy PowerPoints
2. Atoms & Energy Instructional PowerPoint

Inspiration Templates

Discovery Education Movie Clip Titles
1. Exploring Weather: The Atmosphere in Motion 21min. with Blackline Masters

Back to top
Objective:

Earth and Space

112.18.a.4.D (Introduction) Earth and Space
An introduction to Earth's processes. Students should develop an understanding of Earth as part of our solar system. The topics include organization of our solar system, the role of gravity, and space exploration.
112.18.b.10-11 (Knowledge and Skills) Earth and Space
(10) Earth and space. The student understands the structure of Earth, the rock cycle, and plate tectonics. The student is expected to:
(A) build a model to illustrate the structural layers of Earth, including the inner core, outer core, mantle, crust, asthenosphere, and lithosphere;
(B) classify rocks as metamorphic, igneous, or sedimentary by the processes of their formation;
(C) identify the major tectonic plates, including Eurasian, African, Indo-Australian, Pacific, North American, and South American; and
(D) describe how plate tectonics causes major geological events such as ocean basins, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building.
(11) Earth and space. The student understands the organization of our solar system and the relationships among the various bodies that comprise it. The student is expected to:
(A) describe the physical properties, locations, and movements of the Sun, planets, Galilean moons, meteors, asteroids, and comets;
(B) understand that gravity is the force that governs the motion of our solar system; and
(C) describe the history and future of space exploration, including the types of equipment and transportation needed for space travel.
TEKS Review
1. Cold Fronts Maps & Weather Instructional Notebook file
2. Layers of the Earth's Atmosphere Instructional Notebook file
3. Cumulus Clouds Instructional Notebook file
4. Comparing & Contrasting Clouds Instructional Notebook file
5. Changes in Atmosphere Instructional Notebook file
6. Atmosphere Layers Instructional Notebook file
3. Solar System 20 Question Test
4. Fling the Teacher Earth & Space Game
5. Millionaire Game
6. 6th grade Science PortaPortal Links & Games
7. Millionaire Game
8. Moon Phases Games
9. Games
10. Solar System Cloze
11. Solar System Columns Matching
12. Sun & Moon Millionaire Game
3. Solar System 20 Question Test
4. Fling the Teacher Earth & Space Game
5. Millionaire Game
6. 6th grade Science PortaPortal Links & Games
7. Millionaire Game
8. Moon Phases Games
9. Games
10. Solar System Cloze
11. Solar System Columns Matching
12. Sun & Moon Millionaire Game
Interactive Activities
1. Matter interactive websites
2. Mr. Lawson's Interactive websites
3. Build an Atom (PBSKids)
Smartboard Activities
1. Solar Systems Instructional Notebook file
2. Rotation & Revolution Instructional Notebook file
3. Jupitor Instructional Notebook file
4. First 4 Planets Instructional Notebook file
5. Earth's Axis & Tilt Instructional Notebook file
6. Earth, Sun and Seasons Review Notebook
Powerpoints
1. Several Chemistry PowerPoints
Inspiration Templates
1. Label the atom Inspiration file


Back to top

Objective:

Organisms and Environments

112.18.a.4.E (Introduction) Organisms and Environments
Students will gain an understanding of the broadest taxonomic classifications of organisms and how characteristics determine their classification. The other major topics developed in this strand include the interdependence between organisms and their environments and the levels of organization within an ecosystem.
112.18.b.12 (Knowledge and Skills) Organisms and Environments
(12) Organisms and environments. The student knows all organisms are classified into Domains and Kingdoms. Organisms within these taxonomic groups share similar characteristics which allow them to interact with the living and nonliving parts of their ecosystem. The student is expected to:
(A) understand that all organisms are composed of one or more cells;
(B) recognize that the presence of a nucleus determines whether a cell is prokaryotic or eukaryotic;
(C) recognize that the broadest taxonomic classification of living organisms is divided into currently recognized Domains;
(D) identify the basic characteristics of organisms, including prokaryotic or eukaryotic, unicellular or multicellular, autotrophic or heterotrophic, and mode of reproduction, that further classify them in the currently recognized Kingdoms;
(E) describe biotic and abiotic parts of an ecosystem in which organisms interact; and
(F) diagram the levels of organization within an ecosystem, including organism, population, community, and ecosystem.
TEKS Review
1. 6th grade Science PortaPortal Links & Games
2. Drinking & Ground Water Games by EPA
3. More Water Games by EPA
4. Fresh Water Jeopardy SOL Game
5. Games
6. Wonderful Water Millionaire Game
7. Atmosphere SOL Millionaire Game
8. Wonder of Water Cloze
Interactive Activities
1. Mr. Lawson's Interactive websites
Smartboard Activities
1. Weathering Instructional Notebook file
2. Origin and Water on Earth Instructional Notebook file
3. Large Bodies of Water Absorb Heat Instructional Notebook file
4. Large Bodies of Water Instructional Notebook file
5. Difference in Temperatures Instructional Notebook file
6. Density Instructional Notebook file
7. Water Molecule Instructional Notebook file
Powerpoints
1. Several Chemistry PowerPoints

Back to top
Objective:

Resources

Public policy decisions relating to the environment.
SOL Review
2. Millionaire Game
3. 6th grade Science PortaPortal Links & Games
4. Drinking & Ground Water Games by EPA
5. More Water Games by EPA
6. Games
Interactive Activities
1. Mr. Lawson's Interactive websites
2. Kids Conserve Energy website
Study Guides /Research
1. EPA Student Research Info & Pictures
Smartboard Activities
1. Water Conservation Instructional Notebook file
Powerpoints
1. Nonrenewable Instructional PowerPoint
2. Renewable Instructional PowerPoint
3. Instructional PowerPoint
Inspiration Templates
1. Renewable or Not (Free Login required)
2. Renewable vs Nonrenewable Sort (Free Login required)
Discovery Education Movie Clip Titles
1. Basics of Physics: Exploring Energy 41min

Back to top
More Teacher Resources:
1. Hundreds of Science PowerPoints Scroll to the bottom for 6th grade links
2. Brainpop Science Movies Movie clips on Science (Password required, available from your teacher)

WARNING! This page contains hyperlinks to external web sites that are not controlled by Mr. Embry. This web page is provided as a service; the websites link within t his site are sites Mr. Embry has found usefull.Content may change and domain names change. This web page is provided as a service; the websites link within this site are sites Mr. Embry has found usefull. Please let me know if you find a link that is no longer working or contains inappropriate material. If you happen to find a site you think would be valuable for me to link to send me a message:Mr. Embry




Copywriter 2013